Search Contact information
University of Cambridge Home Department of Engineering
University of Cambridge > Engineering Department > Machine Intelligence Lab

Abstract for wong_iccv01

8th IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV 2001), Vancouver, Canada.

STRUCTURE AND MOTION FROM SILHOUETTES

K-Y.K. Wong and R. Cipolla

July 2001

This paper addresses the problem of recovering structure and motion from silhouettes. Silhouettes are projections of contour generators which are viewpoint dependent, and hence do not readily provide point correspondences for exploitation in motion estimation. Previous works have exploited correspondences induced by epipolar tangencies, and a successful solution has been developed in the special case of circular motion (turntable sequences). However, the main drawbacks are (1) new views cannot be added easily at a later time, and (2) part of the structure will always remain invisible under circular motion. In this paper, we overcome the above problems by incorporating arbitrary general views and estimating the camera poses using silhouettes alone. We present a complete and practical system which produces high quality 3D models from 2D uncalibrated silhouettes. The 3D models thus obtained can be refined incrementally by adding new arbitrary views and estimating their poses. Experimental results on various objects are presented, demonstrating the quality of the reconstructions.


(ftp:) wong_iccv01.pdf (http:) wong_iccv01.pdf

If you have difficulty viewing files that end '.gz', which are gzip compressed, then you may be able to find tools to uncompress them at the gzip web site.

If you have difficulty viewing files that are in PostScript, (ending '.ps' or '.ps.gz'), then you may be able to find tools to view them at the gsview web site.

We have attempted to provide automatically generated PDF copies of documents for which only PostScript versions have previously been available. These are clearly marked in the database - due to the nature of the automatic conversion process, they are likely to be badly aliased when viewed at default resolution on screen by acroread.

© 2005 Cambridge University Engineering Dept
Information provided by milab-maintainer