Search Contact information
University of Cambridge Home Department of Engineering
University of Cambridge > Engineering Department > Machine Intelligence Lab

Abstract for syn_tr211

Cambridge University Engineering Department Technical Report CUED/F-INFENG/TR211

FEM EIGENMODES AS SHAPE FEATURES

Mike Syn and Richard Prager

May 1995

The Finite Element Method (FEM) solution of the wave equation which governs the behaviour of elastic structures leads to a generalised eigenproblem. The eigenvectors of this eigenproblem are known as eigenmodes or mode shapes, which we present as an ideal set of shape features for use in model-based 3D ultrasound imaging.

We derive from first principles a framework for the modelling of volumetric linear elastic structures, using the Principal of Virtual Work. This allows us to construct mass and stiffness matrices which describe the shape and physical properties of a shape model.

We go on to examine the properties of the FEM eigenmodes of an elastic shape model, and the suitability of such a model in describing shape changes in biological structures. We show that there is an intimate connection between this model, and a growth model based on diffusion processes.


(ftp:) syn_tr211.ps.gz (http:) syn_tr211.ps.gz
PDF (automatically generated from original PostScript document - may be badly aliased on screen):
  (ftp:) syn_tr211.pdf | (http:) syn_tr211.pdf

If you have difficulty viewing files that end '.gz', which are gzip compressed, then you may be able to find tools to uncompress them at the gzip web site.

If you have difficulty viewing files that are in PostScript, (ending '.ps' or '.ps.gz'), then you may be able to find tools to view them at the gsview web site.

We have attempted to provide automatically generated PDF copies of documents for which only PostScript versions have previously been available. These are clearly marked in the database - due to the nature of the automatic conversion process, they are likely to be badly aliased when viewed at default resolution on screen by acroread.

© 2005 Cambridge University Engineering Dept
Information provided by milab-maintainer